Quickie experiments with WebVR

In a previous post, we linked to a very cool WebVR site created by the BBC, just to give you a taste of what can be done with the technology. Today we’ll share our own experiments with WebVR—just some quick demos we tossed up as a test of the API.

[vr url=https://en-support.files.wordpress.com/2016/12/vr-shortcode-360.jpg view=360]

The demo above shows a “photo sphere” image—the ultimate in wide-angle panoramic photography, capturing every view of a scene in every direction from a fixed viewpoint. Pressing play and selecting VR mode (the VR icon on the lower right) switches to a side-by-side stereo display which, when used with a Cardboard or other compatible viewer, presents an immersive 3D experience. This same image viewed in a browser in non-VR mode (without a headset) displays in a “magic window” that can be dragged with a mouse (on the desktop) or moved through space (on a mobile device) to see different views in the landscape.

On another, plain HTML website, we displayed two WebVR videos: a 3D video of an undersea scene, viewable with a Cardboard or similar viewer, and a 360-degree video of a Madagascar rainforest, which exhibits the magic window effect on a mobile device (no headset needed). We used a simple iframe declaration to embed the former and the JavaScript API for the latter.

Our interactive development team has recently acquired some VR equipment, including various Cardboard-style viewers and other headsets. If you want to learn more, just give us a shout on our contact form. Or you can build your own Google Cardboard viewer for free. Or buy one—some of the less fancy ones are only a few dollars.

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A photo sphere is the ultimate in wide-angle panoramic photography, capturing every view of a scene in every direction.